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Joint submission of Evidence to Joint Committee on Human Rights

The UK Chapter has made a joint submission with the Internet Society in response to the call for evidence that was published by the Joint Committee on Human Rights regarding the Investigatory Powers (Amendment) Bill.

The Joint Committee on Human Rights (JCHR) is a Parliamentary Joint Committee whose main function is to examine all bills and legislative instruments for compatibility with human rights, and to report to both Houses of Parliament on its findings.

The Joint Submission can be found here:

The deadline for submitting evidence was Monday 22 January 2024.… Read more ...

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Joint Briefing on Investigatory Powers (Amendment) Bill [HL]

The UK England Chapter of the Internet Society has joined the Internet Society as well as Big Brother Watch, The Open Rights Group, Privacy International, Liberty and Rights & Security International in drafting a briefing that was distributed to Lords prior to the Report Hearing at the House of Lords on 23 January 2024.

The original Investigatory Powers Act 2016 (IPA) is highly controversial in that it authorised massive, suspicionless surveillance on a scale never seen before, with few safeguards or independent oversight.… Read more ...

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News Policy

Joint statement of scientists and NGOs on the EU’s proposed eIDAS reform

On 2 November 2023, the Internet Society UK Chapter has joined 500 cyber security experts, researchers and NGOs to sign an open letter sounding the alarm about the European Union’s proposed eIDAS reform.

After years of legislative process, the near-final text of the eIDAS regulation has been agreed by trialogue negotiators1 representing EU’s key bodies and will be presented to the public and parliament for a rubber stamp before the end of the year. New legislative articles, introduced in recent closed-door meetings and not yet public, envision that all web browsers distributed in Europe will be required to trust the certificate authorities and cryptographic keys selected by EU governments.… Read more ...

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Response to Consultation on: Powers in relation to UK-related domain name registries

The Chapter has submitted a response to a DSIT (Department for Science, Innovation and Technology) Consultation on: Powers in relation to UK-related domain name registries.

Please find it below:

——– Forwarded Message ——–

Subject:Response from the Internet Society UK Chapter to Consultation on: Powers in relation to UK-related domain name registries
Date:Thu, 31 Aug 2023 14:26:01 +0100
From:Olivier MJ Crépin-Leblond <ocl@gih.com>
To:ukdomainnames.consultation@dcms.gov.uk
CC:Olivier Crépin-Leblond <ocl@isoc-e.org>

Dear Sir/Madam,

the UK Chapter of the Internet Society is hereby responding to the Consultation on the drafting of powers under the Digital Economy Act 2010.… Read more ...

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News Policy

Joint ISOC & ISOC-E response to OFCOM UK Consultation on Net Neutrality

‘Net neutrality’, sometimes referred to as the ‘open internet’, is the principle that users of the internet (both consumers and those making and distributing content) should be in control of what they see and do online – not the broadband or mobile providers that connect people and businesses to the internet (otherwise known as internet service providers or ISPs). The net neutrality rules make sure that the traffic carried across broadband and mobile networks is treated equally and particular content or services are not prioritised or slowed down so that some are favoured over others.… Read more ...

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News Policy

A Joint Call to World Leaders for a Secure and Trusted Digital Economy

ISOC UK has signed a call to world leaders attending the G7 summit to ensure the Internet can support a secure and trusted digital economy for everyone. Measures that undermine encryption weaken security for all.

You can see the letter and sign it at http://www.g7openletter.org


Endnotes: [1]Exceptional access, also referred to as “lawful access,” refers to providing law enforcement and intelligence agencies with access encrypted communications. [2]See:  Keys Under Doormats: Mandating insecurity by requiring government access to all data and communications – and  Open Letter to GCHQ [3]  https://www.networkcomputing.com/network-security/encrypted-traffic-reaches-new-thresholdRead more ...